On the Association Between Self-Reported Own- and Other-Gender Similarity and the Use of Physical and Relational Aggression in Sixth Grade Children

Naomi C Z Andrews, Carol Martin, Annabella M. Gallagher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal was to assess the association between felt similarity to each gender (an aspect of gender identity) and girls’ and boys’ differential use of relational versus physical aggression. We extend past research on gender differences in the use of aggression by expanding the gender dichotomy and allowing for more variations in an individual’s gender identity. Students (N = 414, 47 % female, 6th grade) reported how similar they felt to both their own- and other-gender peers, from which cluster analyses derived four typologies of perceived gender similarity (those who feel similar to their own-gender group; those who feel similar to the other-gender group; those who feel similar to both gender groups; those who feel similar to neither gender group). Peers reported which classmates were relationally and physically aggressive. Analyses compared how girls and boys in each typology of gender similarity differed in their use of relational and physical aggression. Results indicated that most children were engaged in gender normative aggression more than gender non-normative aggression (with the notable exception of low-gender similar girls). Findings were discussed in terms of their importance both for examining a broad spectrum of gender similarity and for understanding the use of aggressive behavior among children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 16 2016

Fingerprint

Aggression
Physical
Child Behavior
Cluster Analysis

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Gender similarity
  • Gender typicality
  • Physical aggression
  • Relational aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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