Who are those "risk-taking adolescents"? Individual differences in developmental neuroimaging research

James M. Bjork, Dustin Pardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has illuminated the development of human brain function. Some of this work in typically-developing youth has ostensibly captured neural underpinnings of adolescent behavior which is characterized by risk-seeking propensity, according to psychometric questionnaires and a wealth of anecdote. Notably, cross-sectional comparisons have revealed age-dependent differences between adolescents and other age groups in regional brain responsiveness to prospective or experienced rewards (usually greater in adolescents) or penalties (usually diminished in adolescents). These differences have been interpreted as reflecting an imbalance between motivational drive and behavioral control mechanisms, especially in mid-adolescence, thus promoting greater risk-taking. While intriguing, we caution here that researchers should be more circumspect in attributing clinically significant adolescent risky behavior to age-group differences in task-elicited fMRI responses from neurotypical subjects. This is because actual mortality and morbidity from behavioral causes (e.g. substance abuse, violence) by mid-adolescence is heavily concentrated in individuals who are not neurotypical, who rather have shown a lifelong history of behavioral disinhibition that frequently meets criteria for a disruptive behavior disorder, such as conduct disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. These young people are at extreme risk of poor psychosocial outcomes, and should be a focus of future neurodevelopmental research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-64
Number of pages9
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Individuality
Neuroimaging
Research
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Adolescent Behavior
Age Groups
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Anecdotes
Conduct Disorder
Brain
Human Development
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Reward
Psychometrics
Violence
Substance-Related Disorders
Research Personnel
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • fmri
  • Punishment
  • Reward
  • Risk-taking
  • Self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

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