When the Bedroom Is the Crime Scene: To What Extent Does Johnson's Typology Account for Intimate Partner Sexual Assault?

Eryn Nicole O'Neal, Katharine Tellis, Cassia Spohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Johnson's (2008) typology of domestic violence was conceptualized to explain the control context and presence of violence in intimate relationships. However, issues surrounding sexual assault in the context of intimate partner violence remain insufficiently addressed. The current study situates sexual assault within Johnson's (2008) typology because prior research has largely ignored it. Doing so is necessary to determine the utility of Johnson's categorizations. Using qualitative data from 134 intimate partner sexual assaults reported to Los Angeles law enforcement in 2008, the present study examines the control context and co-occurrence of physical and sexual assault, as well as the presence of non-physical coercive techniques, such as threats. Theoretical implications regarding the problems surrounding conceptualizing sexual assault vis-à-vis Johnson's categorizations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-303
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Child Custody
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2014

Keywords

  • intimate partner sexual assault
  • intimate partner violence
  • intimate terrorism
  • Johnson's typology
  • qualitative
  • situational couple violence
  • wife rape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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