When in Rome think like a Roman: Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking

Ashley M. Votruba, Sau Kwan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

As a result of increasing globalization, people are exposed to an even greater extent to other cultures, making it possible for individuals to assimilate mindsets that are typical of another culture. Recent work on extracultural cognition has shown that immediate cultural contexts exert powerful influences on cognition and behavioral patterns. This chapter reviews empirical support for extracultural cognition. Specifically, the chapter focuses on dialectical thinking and the well-established finding in the cultural literature that Westerners tend to anticipate linear continuity in the environment and East Asians anticipate change in existing patterns. Research shows, though, that cultural cues may shift these tendencies and-at least temporarily-alter cognitive mindsets to reflect the cognitions of another culture. After a review of the literature, the chapter addresses the implications of extracultural cognition for understanding the influence of dialectical thinking on judgment and decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition
Subtitle of host publicationContradiction, Change, and Holism
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages489-507
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9780199348541
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2018

Fingerprint

Cognition
Literature
Internationality
Cues
Decision Making
Thinking
Research

Keywords

  • Cultural context
  • Cultural cues
  • Decision-making
  • Dialectical thinking
  • Extracultural cognition
  • Judgment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Votruba, A. M., & Kwan, S. (2018). When in Rome think like a Roman: Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking. In The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition: Contradiction, Change, and Holism (pp. 489-507). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017

When in Rome think like a Roman : Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking. / Votruba, Ashley M.; Kwan, Sau.

The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition: Contradiction, Change, and Holism. Oxford University Press, 2018. p. 489-507.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Votruba, AM & Kwan, S 2018, When in Rome think like a Roman: Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking. in The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition: Contradiction, Change, and Holism. Oxford University Press, pp. 489-507. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017
Votruba AM, Kwan S. When in Rome think like a Roman: Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking. In The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition: Contradiction, Change, and Holism. Oxford University Press. 2018. p. 489-507 https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017
Votruba, Ashley M. ; Kwan, Sau. / When in Rome think like a Roman : Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking. The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition: Contradiction, Change, and Holism. Oxford University Press, 2018. pp. 489-507
@inbook{56baa8d2adc142dc96e5fb10b5db6f9b,
title = "When in Rome think like a Roman: Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking",
abstract = "As a result of increasing globalization, people are exposed to an even greater extent to other cultures, making it possible for individuals to assimilate mindsets that are typical of another culture. Recent work on extracultural cognition has shown that immediate cultural contexts exert powerful influences on cognition and behavioral patterns. This chapter reviews empirical support for extracultural cognition. Specifically, the chapter focuses on dialectical thinking and the well-established finding in the cultural literature that Westerners tend to anticipate linear continuity in the environment and East Asians anticipate change in existing patterns. Research shows, though, that cultural cues may shift these tendencies and-at least temporarily-alter cognitive mindsets to reflect the cognitions of another culture. After a review of the literature, the chapter addresses the implications of extracultural cognition for understanding the influence of dialectical thinking on judgment and decision-making.",
keywords = "Cultural context, Cultural cues, Decision-making, Dialectical thinking, Extracultural cognition, Judgment",
author = "Votruba, {Ashley M.} and Sau Kwan",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780199348541",
pages = "489--507",
booktitle = "The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - When in Rome think like a Roman

T2 - Empirical evidence and implications of temporarily adopting dialectical thinking

AU - Votruba, Ashley M.

AU - Kwan, Sau

PY - 2018/1/18

Y1 - 2018/1/18

N2 - As a result of increasing globalization, people are exposed to an even greater extent to other cultures, making it possible for individuals to assimilate mindsets that are typical of another culture. Recent work on extracultural cognition has shown that immediate cultural contexts exert powerful influences on cognition and behavioral patterns. This chapter reviews empirical support for extracultural cognition. Specifically, the chapter focuses on dialectical thinking and the well-established finding in the cultural literature that Westerners tend to anticipate linear continuity in the environment and East Asians anticipate change in existing patterns. Research shows, though, that cultural cues may shift these tendencies and-at least temporarily-alter cognitive mindsets to reflect the cognitions of another culture. After a review of the literature, the chapter addresses the implications of extracultural cognition for understanding the influence of dialectical thinking on judgment and decision-making.

AB - As a result of increasing globalization, people are exposed to an even greater extent to other cultures, making it possible for individuals to assimilate mindsets that are typical of another culture. Recent work on extracultural cognition has shown that immediate cultural contexts exert powerful influences on cognition and behavioral patterns. This chapter reviews empirical support for extracultural cognition. Specifically, the chapter focuses on dialectical thinking and the well-established finding in the cultural literature that Westerners tend to anticipate linear continuity in the environment and East Asians anticipate change in existing patterns. Research shows, though, that cultural cues may shift these tendencies and-at least temporarily-alter cognitive mindsets to reflect the cognitions of another culture. After a review of the literature, the chapter addresses the implications of extracultural cognition for understanding the influence of dialectical thinking on judgment and decision-making.

KW - Cultural context

KW - Cultural cues

KW - Decision-making

KW - Dialectical thinking

KW - Extracultural cognition

KW - Judgment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049544719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049544719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017

DO - 10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0017

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85049544719

SN - 9780199348541

SP - 489

EP - 507

BT - The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition

PB - Oxford University Press

ER -