Victimized children's responses to peers' aggression: Behaviors associated with reduced versus continued victimization

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

256 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the current investigation was to identify victimized children's responses to peers' aggression that may be associated with reduced versus persistent victimization. To address this aim, 199 5-6-year-old children (96 boys, 103 girls) were interviewed twice during kindergarten (fall and spring) about their own victimization experiences and peers' responses to aggression. Observational ratings of children's victimization experiences were used to examine the validity of the self-reported victimization scores. Relations between response strategies and subsequent victimization status were significant only for boys: "having a friend help" was associated with reduced victimization, whereas "fighting back" was related to stable victimization. Implications for future research on peer victimization and intervention with young victimized children are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-73
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Victimized children's responses to peers' aggression: Behaviors associated with reduced versus continued victimization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this