Using the extended parallel process model to explain physicians' decisions to test their patients for kidney disease

Anthony Roberto, Catherine E. Goodall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the effects of perceived threat and efficacy on physicians' intentions and behavior to test their patients' level of kidney functioning. Guided by the extended parallel process model, 151 physicians completed an initial survey measuring threat to patients (i.e., susceptibility and severity) and efficacy (i.e., response-efficacy and self-efficacy), as well as their current intentions and behavior. One-hundred and twelve of these physicians also completed and returned a follow-up survey sent approximately 4 months later using identical measures of intentions and behavior. As predicted, physicians who perceived greater threat to patients and greater efficacy demonstrated greater intentions and behavior to test their patients' level of kidney functioning. The theoretical and practical insights and implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-412
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Kidney Diseases
physician
Disease
Physicians
threat
Kidney
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication

Cite this

Using the extended parallel process model to explain physicians' decisions to test their patients for kidney disease. / Roberto, Anthony; Goodall, Catherine E.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 14, No. 4, 06.2009, p. 400-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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