Underground engineering for sustainable urban development

Sammantha L. Magsino, Paul H. Gilbert, Samuel Ariaratnam, Nancy Rutledge Connery, Gary English, Conrad W. Felice, Youssef M A Hashash, Chris T. Hendrickson, Priscilla P. Nelson, Raymond L. Sterling, George J. Tamaro, Fulvio Tonon, Solmaz Spence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Underground infrastructure is essential for delivery of services that support a strong urban economy and high quality of life. However, current underground engineering practice and education do not promote the interdisciplinary and systems-oriented development approaches that support urban sustainability. Further, lack of long-term investment and coordination of underground development and engineering at most levels of U.S. government curtails cost effectiveness and sustainability and jeopardizes future U.S. technological leadership in underground engineering. Ad hoc development of underground infrastructure projects adversely affects sustainability and increases infrastructure costs. Comprehensive lifecycle planning of underground space as part of a three-dimensional, integrated above- and belowground urban system could reduce costs and increase sustainability. Better analysis and design approaches that facilitate long-term asset management also support sustainability. Retrospective cost analyses of existing infrastructure can inform future triple-bottom-line cost assessments and quantify the economic, social, and environmental benefits of different infrastructure choices. Targeted long-term research, better interdisciplinary education and training for underground engineers, and greater societal awareness of the importance of the underground are needed to maximize the contributions of underground engineering to sustainability. This paper summarizes conclusions from the National Research Council report Underground Engineering for Sustainable Urban Development (2013; http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record-id=14670).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeotechnical Special Publication
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages3861-3870
Number of pages10
Edition234 GSP
ISBN (Print)9780784413272
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event2014 Congress on Geo-Characterization and Modeling for Sustainability, Geo-Congress 2014 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Feb 23 2014Feb 26 2014

Other

Other2014 Congress on Geo-Characterization and Modeling for Sustainability, Geo-Congress 2014
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period2/23/142/26/14

Fingerprint

urban development
Sustainable development
sustainability
engineering
infrastructure
cost
Costs
Education
urban economy
Asset management
education and training
urban system
Cost effectiveness
quality of life
leadership
education
Engineers
Planning
Economics
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

Cite this

Magsino, S. L., Gilbert, P. H., Ariaratnam, S., Rutledge Connery, N., English, G., Felice, C. W., ... Spence, S. (2014). Underground engineering for sustainable urban development. In Geotechnical Special Publication (234 GSP ed., pp. 3861-3870). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413272.374

Underground engineering for sustainable urban development. / Magsino, Sammantha L.; Gilbert, Paul H.; Ariaratnam, Samuel; Rutledge Connery, Nancy; English, Gary; Felice, Conrad W.; Hashash, Youssef M A; Hendrickson, Chris T.; Nelson, Priscilla P.; Sterling, Raymond L.; Tamaro, George J.; Tonon, Fulvio; Spence, Solmaz.

Geotechnical Special Publication. 234 GSP. ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. p. 3861-3870.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Magsino, SL, Gilbert, PH, Ariaratnam, S, Rutledge Connery, N, English, G, Felice, CW, Hashash, YMA, Hendrickson, CT, Nelson, PP, Sterling, RL, Tamaro, GJ, Tonon, F & Spence, S 2014, Underground engineering for sustainable urban development. in Geotechnical Special Publication. 234 GSP edn, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 3861-3870, 2014 Congress on Geo-Characterization and Modeling for Sustainability, Geo-Congress 2014, Atlanta, GA, United States, 2/23/14. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413272.374
Magsino SL, Gilbert PH, Ariaratnam S, Rutledge Connery N, English G, Felice CW et al. Underground engineering for sustainable urban development. In Geotechnical Special Publication. 234 GSP ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2014. p. 3861-3870 https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784413272.374
Magsino, Sammantha L. ; Gilbert, Paul H. ; Ariaratnam, Samuel ; Rutledge Connery, Nancy ; English, Gary ; Felice, Conrad W. ; Hashash, Youssef M A ; Hendrickson, Chris T. ; Nelson, Priscilla P. ; Sterling, Raymond L. ; Tamaro, George J. ; Tonon, Fulvio ; Spence, Solmaz. / Underground engineering for sustainable urban development. Geotechnical Special Publication. 234 GSP. ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. pp. 3861-3870
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