Typing versus thinking aloud when reading

Implications for computer-based assessment and training tools

Brenton Muñoz, Joseph P. Magliano, Robin Sheridan, Danielle McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to assess the impact of modality of production of think-aloud protocols on reading strategies. Readers in two studies spoke or typed protocols for narrative or science texts and completed comprehension tests for each text Human judges identified the presence of paraphrasing, bridging inferences, and elaborating within the protocols. Reading comprehension skill was assessed with the Nelson-Denny test With respect to narrative texts, paraphrasing and bridging were less frequent when readers were typing than when they were thinking aloud. With respect to science texts, less-skilled readers made bridging inferences more frequently when typing than when speaking. Conversely, skilled readers generated more paraphrases than bridges when typing thoughts but not when speaking. These results have implications for computer-based tools for reading assessment and intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalBehavior Research Methods
Volume38
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reading
Thinking
Reading Aloud
Reader
Paraphrasing
Inference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Typing versus thinking aloud when reading : Implications for computer-based assessment and training tools. / Muñoz, Brenton; Magliano, Joseph P.; Sheridan, Robin; McNamara, Danielle.

In: Behavior Research Methods, Vol. 38, No. 2, 03.2006, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muñoz, Brenton ; Magliano, Joseph P. ; Sheridan, Robin ; McNamara, Danielle. / Typing versus thinking aloud when reading : Implications for computer-based assessment and training tools. In: Behavior Research Methods. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 211-217.
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