Tree canopy change and neighborhood stability: A comparative analysis of Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD

Wen Ching Chuang, Christopher Boone, Dexter H. Locke, J. Morgan Grove, Ali Whitmer, Geoffrey Buckley, Sainan Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trees provide important health, ecosystem, and aesthetic services in urban areas, but they are unevenly distributed. Some neighborhoods have abundant tree canopy and others nearly none. We analyzed how neighborhood characteristics and changes in income over time related to the distribution of urban tree canopy in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD. We used stepwise multiple regression analysis to identify strong predictors of UTC, from variables found in neighborhoods with different patterns of wealth-stability over time. We then built spatial lag models to predict variation in UTC cover, using the results of a Principal Component Analysis of the socioeconomic, demographic, and housing characteristics of the two cities. We found that: (1) stable-wealthy neighborhoods were more likely to have more, and more consistent, tree canopy cover than other neighborhood types; (2) decreases and increases in income were negatively associated with UTC in Washington, D.C. but not Baltimore, where income stability in both wealthy and impoverished neighborhoods was a significant predictor of UTC; and (3) the association of high socioeconomic status with UTC coverage varied between the two cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-372
Number of pages10
JournalUrban Forestry and Urban Greening
Volume27
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

District of Columbia
canopy
income
aesthetics
socioeconomic status
urban areas
socioeconomics
principal component analysis
regression analysis
demographic statistics
ecosystem health
esthetics
multiple regression
analysis
urban area

Keywords

  • GIS
  • Neighborhood stability
  • Spatial lag regression
  • Urban tree canopy (UTC)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Tree canopy change and neighborhood stability : A comparative analysis of Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD. / Chuang, Wen Ching; Boone, Christopher; Locke, Dexter H.; Grove, J. Morgan; Whitmer, Ali; Buckley, Geoffrey; Zhang, Sainan.

In: Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, Vol. 27, 01.10.2017, p. 363-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chuang, Wen Ching ; Boone, Christopher ; Locke, Dexter H. ; Grove, J. Morgan ; Whitmer, Ali ; Buckley, Geoffrey ; Zhang, Sainan. / Tree canopy change and neighborhood stability : A comparative analysis of Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD. In: Urban Forestry and Urban Greening. 2017 ; Vol. 27. pp. 363-372.
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