Traveling Alone or Together? Neighborhood Context on Individual and Group Juvenile and Adult Burglary Decisions

Alyssa W. Chamberlain, Lyndsay N. Boggess, Taylor Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Neighborhood characteristics are important considerations when offenders make targeting decisions. Movement patterns among adults and juveniles vary widely, which impacts both the number of crime opportunities and the range of neighborhoods to which an offender is exposed. We test whether offending patterns among adult and juvenile burglars vary based on distances traveled, the types of neighborhoods targeted, and whether suspects acted alone or in a group. Using discrete choice modeling, we draw upon a unique sample of cleared burglaries in a representative city in the south over a 13-year period. Results show that adult burglars consistently travel further and are more sensitive to neighborhood conditions than their juvenile counterparts, but that group participation makes little difference in target decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCrime and Delinquency
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • drugs arrests
  • neighborhood race
  • non-serious crime
  • racial disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Traveling Alone or Together? Neighborhood Context on Individual and Group Juvenile and Adult Burglary Decisions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this