Transgenic plants as vaccine production systems

Hugh Mason, Charles J. Arntzen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transgenic plants that express foreign proteins with industrial or pharmaceutical value represent an economical alternative to fermentation-based production systems. Specific vaccines have been produced in plants as a result of the transient or stable expression of foreign genes. It has recently been shown that genes encoding antigens of bacterial and viral pathogens can be expressed in plants in a form in which they retain native immunogenic properties. Transgenic potato tubers expressing a bacterial antigen stimulated humoral and mucosal immune responses when they were provided as food. These results provide 'proof of concept' for the use of plants as a vehicle to produce vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-392
Number of pages5
JournalTrends in Biotechnology
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacterial Antigens
Vaccines
Genetically Modified Plants
Antigens
Gene encoding
Viral Antigens
Pathogens
Drug products
Fermentation
Mucosal Immunity
Genes
Humoral Immunity
Solanum tuberosum
Proteins
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gene Expression
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Transgenic plants as vaccine production systems. / Mason, Hugh; Arntzen, Charles J.

In: Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 13, No. 9, 1995, p. 388-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mason, Hugh ; Arntzen, Charles J. / Transgenic plants as vaccine production systems. In: Trends in Biotechnology. 1995 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 388-392.
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