Tissue micromotion induced stress around brain implants

Jitendran Muthuswamy, R. Saha, A. Gilletti

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The long-term consequences of tissue micromotion against stationary brain implants are poorly understood. Our aim here is to measure surface micromotion in the rodent somatosensory cortex and estimate mechanical stresses induced in the brain tissue due to micromotion against stationary implants. A differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT) was used in adult rats to monitor micromotion normal to the somatosensory cortex surface. Using finite element models of the brain, we then estimated shear and normal stresses in the brain tissue in the vicinity of the brain implants. Surface micromotion was observed to be few tens of microns due to pressure changes during respiration and 2-4 μm due to vascular pulsatility. Maximum shear stress values of up to 2.5-3.5 KPa were estimated near the tip of a 50 μm diameter implant. Tissue micromotion on the surface of the somatosensory cortex can lead to significant shear and normal stress build-up in the brain tissue in the vicinity of cylindrical brain implants. The impact of the mechanical stress on brain tissue viability and function under chronic in-vivo conditions needs to be assessed in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology
Pages102-103
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology - Oahu, HI, United States
Duration: May 12 2005May 15 2005

Publication series

Name2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology
Volume2005

Other

Other2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology
CountryUnited States
CityOahu, HI
Period5/12/055/15/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Muthuswamy, J., Saha, R., & Gilletti, A. (2005). Tissue micromotion induced stress around brain implants. In 2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology (pp. 102-103). [1548395] (2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology; Vol. 2005). https://doi.org/10.1109/MMB.2005.1548395