The wealth→life history→innovation account of the Industrial Revolution is largely inconsistent with empirical time series data

Michael E.W. Varnum, Igor Grossmann

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Baumard proposes a model to explain the dramatic rise in innovation that occurred during the Industrial Revolution, whereby rising living standards led to slower life history strategies, which, in turn, fostered innovation. We test his model explicitly using time series data, finding limited support for these proposed linkages. Instead, we find evidence that rising living standards appear to have a time-lagged bidirectional relationship with increasing innovation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e212
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume42
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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