The Relations of Children's Dispositional Prosocial Behavior to Emotionality, Regulation, and Social Functioning

Nancy Eisenberg, Richard Fabes, Mariss Karbon, Bridget C. Murphy, Marek Wosinski, Lorena Polazzi, Gustavo Carlo, Candy Juhnke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

186 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of a measure of children's dispositional prosocial behavior (i.e., peer nominations) to individual differences in children's negative emotionality, regulation, and social functioning. Children with prosocial reputations tended to be high in constructive social skills (i.e., socially appropriate behavior and constructive coping) and attentional regulation, and low in negative emotionality. The relations of children's negative emotionality to prosocial reputation were moderated by level of dispositional attentional regulation. In addition, the relations of prosocial reputation to constructive social skills and parent-reported negative emotionality (for girls) increased with age. Vagal tone, a marker of physiological regulation, was negatively related to girls' prosocial reputation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)974-992
Number of pages19
JournalChild Development
Volume67
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1996

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emotionality
reputation
regulation
Psychological Adaptation
Individuality
coping
parents
Social Skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The Relations of Children's Dispositional Prosocial Behavior to Emotionality, Regulation, and Social Functioning. / Eisenberg, Nancy; Fabes, Richard; Karbon, Mariss; Murphy, Bridget C.; Wosinski, Marek; Polazzi, Lorena; Carlo, Gustavo; Juhnke, Candy.

In: Child Development, Vol. 67, No. 3, 06.1996, p. 974-992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eisenberg, N, Fabes, R, Karbon, M, Murphy, BC, Wosinski, M, Polazzi, L, Carlo, G & Juhnke, C 1996, 'The Relations of Children's Dispositional Prosocial Behavior to Emotionality, Regulation, and Social Functioning', Child Development, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 974-992.
Eisenberg, Nancy ; Fabes, Richard ; Karbon, Mariss ; Murphy, Bridget C. ; Wosinski, Marek ; Polazzi, Lorena ; Carlo, Gustavo ; Juhnke, Candy. / The Relations of Children's Dispositional Prosocial Behavior to Emotionality, Regulation, and Social Functioning. In: Child Development. 1996 ; Vol. 67, No. 3. pp. 974-992.
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