The practice integration profile

Rationale, development, method, and research

Charles Macchi, Rodger Kessler, Andrea Auxier, Juvena R. Hitt, Daniel Mullin, Constance van Eeghen, Benjamin Littenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Insufficient knowledge exists regarding how to measure the presence and degree of integrated care. Prior estimates of integration levels are neither grounded in theory nor psychometrically validated. They provide scant guidance to inform improvement activities, compare integration efforts, discriminate among practices by degree of integration, measure the effect of integration on quadruple aim outcomes, or address the needs of clinicians, regulators, and policymakers seeking new models of health care delivery and funding. We describe the development of the Practice Integration Profile (PIP), a novel instrument designed to measure levels of integrated behavioral health care within a primary care clinic. The PIP draws upon the Agency for Health care Research & Quality's (AHRQ) Lexicon of Collaborative Care which provides theoretic justification for a paradigm case of collaborative care. We used the key clauses of the Lexicon to derive domains of integration and generate measures corresponding to those key clauses. After reviewing currently used methods for identifying collaborative care, or integration, and identifying the need to improve on them, we describe a national collaboration to describe and evaluate the PIP. We also describe its potential use in practice improvement, research, responsiveness to multiple stakeholder needs, and other future directions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-341
Number of pages8
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Health Services Research
Research
Primary Health Care
Direction compound
Grounded Theory

Keywords

  • Behavioral health
  • Integration
  • Measurement
  • Primary care
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The practice integration profile : Rationale, development, method, and research. / Macchi, Charles; Kessler, Rodger; Auxier, Andrea; Hitt, Juvena R.; Mullin, Daniel; van Eeghen, Constance; Littenberg, Benjamin.

In: Families, Systems and Health, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 334-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Macchi, Charles ; Kessler, Rodger ; Auxier, Andrea ; Hitt, Juvena R. ; Mullin, Daniel ; van Eeghen, Constance ; Littenberg, Benjamin. / The practice integration profile : Rationale, development, method, and research. In: Families, Systems and Health. 2016 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 334-341.
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