The moneyball problem: What is the best way to present situational statistics to an athlete?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Athletes in most sports now have access to an abundance of information about the situational tendencies of their opponent(s) but it is currently unclear how effectively this information can be used or how to best present it. Three different methods for presenting situational information about a baseball pitcher were compared for college baseball players hitting in a batting simulator: Build-Up (shown cumulative pitch distributions), Full (shown complete distributions) and Control (shown no distributions). Initially, both the Build-Up and Full groups had significantly higher batting averages than the control group, however, the Full group had significantly lower batting performance when the pitcher was changed. Providing situational probability information gives a significant advantage to a batter, however, there is a trade-off (between short-term effectiveness and negative transfer) which depends on how the information is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1377-1381
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Gray, R. (2015). The moneyball problem: What is the best way to present situational statistics to an athlete? In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (pp. 1377-1381). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2015-January). Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc..