The Moderating Capacity of Racial Identity Between Perceived Discrimination and Psychological Well-Being Over Time Among African American Youth

Eleanor K. Seaton, Enrique W. Neblett, Rachel D. Upton, Wizdom Powell Hammond, Robert M. Sellers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the influence of racial identity in the longitudinal relation between perceptions of racial discrimination and psychological well-being for approximately 560 African American youth. Latent curve modeling (LCM) and parallel process multiple-indicator LCMs with latent moderators were used to assess whether perceptions of racial discrimination predicted the intercept (initial levels) and the slope (rate of change) of psychological well-being over time, and whether racial identity moderates these relations. The results indicated that African American adolescents who reported higher psychological responses to discrimination frequency levels at the first time point had lower initial levels of well-being. Regressing the slope factor for psychological well-being on the frequency of discrimination also revealed a nonsignificant result for subsequent well-being levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1850-1867
Number of pages18
JournalChild development
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Moderating Capacity of Racial Identity Between Perceived Discrimination and Psychological Well-Being Over Time Among African American Youth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this