THE LIFE CYCLE OF BANGIA FUSCOPURPUREA IN CULTURE. I. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND PHOTOPERIOD ON THE MORPHOLOGY AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BANGIA PHASE

Milton R. Sommerfeld, H. Wayne Nichols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Bangia phase of Bangia fuscopurpurea was grown in laboratory culture in a variety of photoperiod and temperature regimes. Plants of the Bangia phase grown from 2 types of asexual spores, monospores and conchospores, exhibited growth differences under similar growing conditions. Plants derived from monospores grew more rapidly and matured earlier than those derived from carpospores. Day length and temperature were found to significantly influence growth rule, maturation, and plant size. Long day lengths resulted in more rapid growth in filament length and diameter and earlier spore formation and spore release. Maximum filament length was observed in a 12/12 hr light‐dark cycle at 15 C. Spore formation and release were delayed by decreasing day length or temperature. Temperature and photoperiod were also found to influence the type of spores produced by the Bangia phase. When grown at 22 C, the Bangia phase produced only monospores, which reproduced the Bangia phase. At 9 C, with photoperiods of 11 hr or more of light, the Bangia phase produced carpospores which gave rise to the alternating Conchocelis phase. The conditions under which sporogenesis occurred determined the spore type differentiated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Phycology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1973

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Bangia
photoperiod
spore
life cycle (organisms)
life cycle
spores
day length
temperature
Conchocelis
effect
maturation
sporulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

THE LIFE CYCLE OF BANGIA FUSCOPURPUREA IN CULTURE. I. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND PHOTOPERIOD ON THE MORPHOLOGY AND REPRODUCTION OF THE BANGIA PHASE. / Sommerfeld, Milton R.; Nichols, H. Wayne.

In: Journal of Phycology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 1973, p. 205-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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