The influence of a friend's perspective on American Indian children's recall of previously misconstrued events

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of American Indian children (N = 99; 7-12 years of age) to reframe a memory of a friend's seemingly mean-spirited actions (Story 1) after hearing the friend's perspective detailing her/his good intentions (Story 2) was explored. Children in a control group heard an unrelated Story 2 and did not alter their retelling of Story 1. Good verbal skills facilitated the integration of the friend's perspective in memory for the children who heard the friend's explanation. Higher scores on the working memory and inhibition tasks were associated with higher verbal ability scores. Older children had better working memory and inhibitory skills than younger children. Cultural engagement predicted better social competence ratings but not higher memory reframing scores as predicted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1481-1496
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
event
Aptitude
Short-Term Memory
social competence
ability
Hearing
rating
Control Groups
Group

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Basic cognitive skills
  • Individual differences
  • Memory
  • Perspective taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

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