The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial: 12 and 24-month outcomes

Nancy E. Sherwood, Rona L. Levy, Elisabeth M. Seburg, A. Lauren Crain, Shelby Langer, Meghan M. JaKa, Alicia Kunin-Batson, Robert W. Jeffery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Pediatric primary care is an important setting for addressing obesity prevention. Objective: The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric primary care provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. Methods: Children aged 5 to 10 years with a BMI between the 70th and 95th percentile and their parents were recruited from pediatric primary care clinics. Participants received well-child visit provider counseling about obesity and safety/injury prevention and were then randomized to a 14-session phone-based obesity prevention (OP; n = 212) or safety and injury prevention contact control (CC; n = 209) intervention. The primary outcome was 12 and 24-month child BMI percentile. Results: There was no overall significant treatment effect on child BMI percentile. Caloric intake was significantly lower among OP compared with CC participants at 12 months (P <.005). In planned subgroup analyses, OP condition girls had significantly lower BMI percentile (P <.05) and BMI z-score (P <.02) at 12 and 24 months relative to CC girls and were less likely to be overweight (38.0% vs 53.0%, P <.01) or (obese 3.4% vs 8.8%, P <.10) at follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance: An obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone counseling did not impact 12 and 24-month BMI status overall but did have a significant impact on BMI in girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12523
JournalPediatric Obesity
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Obesity
Counseling
Primary Health Care
Pediatrics
Safety
Wounds and Injuries
Energy Intake
Randomized Controlled Trials
Parents
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Obesity prevention
  • overweight
  • pediatric obesity
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Health Policy
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sherwood, N. E., Levy, R. L., Seburg, E. M., Crain, A. L., Langer, S., JaKa, M. M., ... Jeffery, R. W. (2019). The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial: 12 and 24-month outcomes. Pediatric Obesity, [e12523]. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijpo.12523

The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial : 12 and 24-month outcomes. / Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.; Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Crain, A. Lauren; Langer, Shelby; JaKa, Meghan M.; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Jeffery, Robert W.

In: Pediatric Obesity, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sherwood, NE, Levy, RL, Seburg, EM, Crain, AL, Langer, S, JaKa, MM, Kunin-Batson, A & Jeffery, RW 2019, 'The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial: 12 and 24-month outcomes', Pediatric Obesity. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijpo.12523
Sherwood, Nancy E. ; Levy, Rona L. ; Seburg, Elisabeth M. ; Crain, A. Lauren ; Langer, Shelby ; JaKa, Meghan M. ; Kunin-Batson, Alicia ; Jeffery, Robert W. / The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial : 12 and 24-month outcomes. In: Pediatric Obesity. 2019.
@article{c85a99b1b52844b6a45f4670bbb31d69,
title = "The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial: 12 and 24-month outcomes",
abstract = "Background: Pediatric primary care is an important setting for addressing obesity prevention. Objective: The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric primary care provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. Methods: Children aged 5 to 10 years with a BMI between the 70th and 95th percentile and their parents were recruited from pediatric primary care clinics. Participants received well-child visit provider counseling about obesity and safety/injury prevention and were then randomized to a 14-session phone-based obesity prevention (OP; n = 212) or safety and injury prevention contact control (CC; n = 209) intervention. The primary outcome was 12 and 24-month child BMI percentile. Results: There was no overall significant treatment effect on child BMI percentile. Caloric intake was significantly lower among OP compared with CC participants at 12 months (P <.005). In planned subgroup analyses, OP condition girls had significantly lower BMI percentile (P <.05) and BMI z-score (P <.02) at 12 and 24 months relative to CC girls and were less likely to be overweight (38.0{\%} vs 53.0{\%}, P <.01) or (obese 3.4{\%} vs 8.8{\%}, P <.10) at follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance: An obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone counseling did not impact 12 and 24-month BMI status overall but did have a significant impact on BMI in girls.",
keywords = "Obesity prevention, overweight, pediatric obesity, primary care",
author = "Sherwood, {Nancy E.} and Levy, {Rona L.} and Seburg, {Elisabeth M.} and Crain, {A. Lauren} and Shelby Langer and JaKa, {Meghan M.} and Alicia Kunin-Batson and Jeffery, {Robert W.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ijpo.12523",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Pediatric obesity",
issn = "2047-6310",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell for the International Association for the Study of Obesity",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 Obesity Prevention Trial

T2 - 12 and 24-month outcomes

AU - Sherwood, Nancy E.

AU - Levy, Rona L.

AU - Seburg, Elisabeth M.

AU - Crain, A. Lauren

AU - Langer, Shelby

AU - JaKa, Meghan M.

AU - Kunin-Batson, Alicia

AU - Jeffery, Robert W.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Pediatric primary care is an important setting for addressing obesity prevention. Objective: The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric primary care provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. Methods: Children aged 5 to 10 years with a BMI between the 70th and 95th percentile and their parents were recruited from pediatric primary care clinics. Participants received well-child visit provider counseling about obesity and safety/injury prevention and were then randomized to a 14-session phone-based obesity prevention (OP; n = 212) or safety and injury prevention contact control (CC; n = 209) intervention. The primary outcome was 12 and 24-month child BMI percentile. Results: There was no overall significant treatment effect on child BMI percentile. Caloric intake was significantly lower among OP compared with CC participants at 12 months (P <.005). In planned subgroup analyses, OP condition girls had significantly lower BMI percentile (P <.05) and BMI z-score (P <.02) at 12 and 24 months relative to CC girls and were less likely to be overweight (38.0% vs 53.0%, P <.01) or (obese 3.4% vs 8.8%, P <.10) at follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance: An obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone counseling did not impact 12 and 24-month BMI status overall but did have a significant impact on BMI in girls.

AB - Background: Pediatric primary care is an important setting for addressing obesity prevention. Objective: The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids 5-10 randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric primary care provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. Methods: Children aged 5 to 10 years with a BMI between the 70th and 95th percentile and their parents were recruited from pediatric primary care clinics. Participants received well-child visit provider counseling about obesity and safety/injury prevention and were then randomized to a 14-session phone-based obesity prevention (OP; n = 212) or safety and injury prevention contact control (CC; n = 209) intervention. The primary outcome was 12 and 24-month child BMI percentile. Results: There was no overall significant treatment effect on child BMI percentile. Caloric intake was significantly lower among OP compared with CC participants at 12 months (P <.005). In planned subgroup analyses, OP condition girls had significantly lower BMI percentile (P <.05) and BMI z-score (P <.02) at 12 and 24 months relative to CC girls and were less likely to be overweight (38.0% vs 53.0%, P <.01) or (obese 3.4% vs 8.8%, P <.10) at follow-up. Conclusions and Relevance: An obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone counseling did not impact 12 and 24-month BMI status overall but did have a significant impact on BMI in girls.

KW - Obesity prevention

KW - overweight

KW - pediatric obesity

KW - primary care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063002514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063002514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ijpo.12523

DO - 10.1111/ijpo.12523

M3 - Article

C2 - 30873752

AN - SCOPUS:85063002514

JO - Pediatric obesity

JF - Pediatric obesity

SN - 2047-6310

M1 - e12523

ER -