The challenges of challenge.gov: Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government

Ines Mergel, Stuart Bretschneider, Claudia Louis, Jason Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As part of the Open Government Initiative in the U.S. federal government, the White House has introduced a new policy instrument called "Challenges and Prizes", implemented as Challenge.gov that allows federal departments to run Open Innovation (OI) contests. This initiative was motivated by similar OI initiatives in the private sector and to enhance innovativeness and performance among federal agencies. Here we first define the underlying theoretical concepts of OI, crowdsourcing and contests and apply them to the existing theory of publicness and the creation of public goods. We then analyze over 200 crowdsourcing contests on CHALLENGE.GOV and conclude that federal departments and agencies use this policy instrument for four different purpose: awareness, service, knowledge and technical solutions. We conclude that Challenge.gov is currently used as an innovative format to inform and educate the public about public management problems and less frequently to solicit complex technological solutions from problem solvers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2073-2082
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781479925049
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014 - Waikoloa, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 6 2014Jan 9 2014

Other

Other47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa, HI
Period1/6/141/9/14

Fingerprint

Innovation
Industry
Crowdsourcing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Mergel, I., Bretschneider, S., Louis, C., & Smith, J. (2014). The challenges of challenge.gov: Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (pp. 2073-2082). [6758860] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2014.262

The challenges of challenge.gov : Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government. / Mergel, Ines; Bretschneider, Stuart; Louis, Claudia; Smith, Jason.

Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. IEEE Computer Society, 2014. p. 2073-2082 6758860.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mergel, I, Bretschneider, S, Louis, C & Smith, J 2014, The challenges of challenge.gov: Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government. in Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences., 6758860, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 2073-2082, 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014, Waikoloa, HI, United States, 1/6/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2014.262
Mergel I, Bretschneider S, Louis C, Smith J. The challenges of challenge.gov: Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. IEEE Computer Society. 2014. p. 2073-2082. 6758860 https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2014.262
Mergel, Ines ; Bretschneider, Stuart ; Louis, Claudia ; Smith, Jason. / The challenges of challenge.gov : Adopting private sector business innovations in the federal government. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. IEEE Computer Society, 2014. pp. 2073-2082
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