The case for software evolution

Claire Le Goues, Stephanie Forrest, Westley Weimer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many software systems exceed our human ability to comprehend and manage, and they continue to contain unacceptable errors. This is an unintended consequence of Moore's Law, which has led to increases in system size, complexity, and interconnectedness. Yet, software is still primarily created, modified, and maintained by humans. The interactions among heterogeneous programs, machines and human operators has reached a level of complexity rivaling that of some biological ecosystems. By viewing software as an evolving complex system, researchers could incorporate biologically inspired mechanisms and employ the quantitative analysis methods of evolutionary biology. This approach could improve our understanding and analysis of software; it could lead to robust methods for automatically writing, debugging and improving code; and it could improve predictions about functional and structural transitions as scale increases. In the short term, an evolutionary perspective challenges several research assumptions, enabling advances in error detection, correction, and prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010
Pages205-209
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventFSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010 - Santa Fe, NM, United States
Duration: Nov 7 2010Nov 11 2010

Other

OtherFSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySanta Fe, NM
Period11/7/1011/11/10

Fingerprint

Error detection
Ecosystems
Large scale systems
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Evolutionary computation
  • Genetic programming
  • Program repair
  • Software engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

Cite this

Le Goues, C., Forrest, S., & Weimer, W. (2010). The case for software evolution. In Proceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010 (pp. 205-209) https://doi.org/10.1145/1882362.1882406

The case for software evolution. / Le Goues, Claire; Forrest, Stephanie; Weimer, Westley.

Proceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010. 2010. p. 205-209.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Le Goues, C, Forrest, S & Weimer, W 2010, The case for software evolution. in Proceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010. pp. 205-209, FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010, Santa Fe, NM, United States, 11/7/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1882362.1882406
Le Goues C, Forrest S, Weimer W. The case for software evolution. In Proceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010. 2010. p. 205-209 https://doi.org/10.1145/1882362.1882406
Le Goues, Claire ; Forrest, Stephanie ; Weimer, Westley. / The case for software evolution. Proceedings of the FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, FoSER 2010. 2010. pp. 205-209
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