The association of maternal socialization in childhood and adolescence with adult offsprings' sympathy/caring

Nancy Eisenberg, Sarah K. VanSchyndel, Claire Hofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine associations between mothers' socialization practices in childhood and adolescence and offsprings' (N = 32, 16 female) sympathy/concern in early adulthood. Mothers reported on their socialization practices and beliefs a total of 6 times using a Q-sort during their offsprings' childhood (between 7-8 and 11-12 years of age) and adolescence (between 13-14 and 17-18 years of age). Adult offsprings' sympathy/caring was assessed 3 times in early adulthood (at ages 19-20 to 23-24 years) and in their mid-20s to 30s (ages 25-26 to 31-32 years). In general, friends' reports of participants' sympathy/concern at ages 25-32 years related positively to mother-reported rational discipline (including inductions) and warmth and support during childhood and adolescence and negatively to mother-reported negative affect during adolescence. Self-reported sympathy/concern during early adulthood was positively related to maternal warmth and support during childhood and almost significantly negatively related to mother-reported negative affect during childhood and adolescence. Most of the relations held when the prior level of self-reported childhood empathy or adolescent sympathy was controlled.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-16
Number of pages10
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Socialization
Adult Children
sympathy
socialization
adolescence
childhood
Mothers
adulthood
Q-Sort
empathy
induction
adolescent

Keywords

  • Socialization
  • Sympathy
  • Young adulthood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

The association of maternal socialization in childhood and adolescence with adult offsprings' sympathy/caring. / Eisenberg, Nancy; VanSchyndel, Sarah K.; Hofer, Claire.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2015, p. 7-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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