The association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes and cortisol reactivity and regulation in 7-month-old infants

Pamela Schuetze, Francisco A. Lopez, Douglas A. Granger, Rina D. Eiden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes and adrenocortical responses to stress in 7-month-old infants. Cortisol levels were assessed twice prior to and twice following affect-eliciting procedures in 111 (59 exposed and 52 nonexposed) infants. Cortisol reactivity was defined as the difference between the peak poststressor cortisol level and the pretask cortisol level. Higher values indicated higher cortisol reactivity. Exposed infants had higher peak cortisol reactivity than nonexposed infants. There were no differences in pretask cortisol levels. Maternal hostility mediated the association between cigarette exposure and peak cortisol reactivity. Furthermore, infant gender moderated this association such that exposed boys had significantly higher peak cortisol reactivity than nonexposed infants or exposed girls. These findings provide additional evidence that prenatal cigarette exposure is associated with dysregulation during infancy and that early adverse, nonsocial expenriences may have relatively long-lasting effects on cortisol reactivity in infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-834
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Tobacco Products
Hydrocortisone
Hostility
Mothers

Keywords

  • HPA axis
  • Infant
  • Maternal hostility
  • Prenatal cigarette exposure
  • Reactivity
  • Sex differences
  • Stress response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes and cortisol reactivity and regulation in 7-month-old infants. / Schuetze, Pamela; Lopez, Francisco A.; Granger, Douglas A.; Eiden, Rina D.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 50, No. 8, 2008, p. 819-834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schuetze, Pamela ; Lopez, Francisco A. ; Granger, Douglas A. ; Eiden, Rina D. / The association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes and cortisol reactivity and regulation in 7-month-old infants. In: Developmental Psychobiology. 2008 ; Vol. 50, No. 8. pp. 819-834.
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