Testing the provenance of Patayan pottery at Las Colinas: Chemical and petrographic analyses of phyllite-temper fragments

David Abbott, Sophia E. Kelly, Andrew D. Lack, Margaret E. Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mobile Patayan foragers of the interior desert of southwestern Arizona were makers of Lower Colorado Buff Ware ceramics. These containers were sometimes traded to Hohokam irrigation agriculturalists at the western margin of the Hohokam territory. By A.D. 1100, the distribution of Patayan Buff Wares shifted to the east, penetrating the Hohokam heartland. Some theorists have suggested the ceramic distribution implies a migration of Patayan people, who joined agricultural communities in the Hohokam core area. One way to assess this idea is to identify the production of Patayan material culture within the Hohokam territory. We test for the local manufacture of Lower Colorado Buff Ware at the Hohokam village of Las Colinas, where Patayan pottery was found in abundance, and a Patayan enclave has been inferred. Using petrographic analysis and SEM-EDS assays of the phyllite temper fragments in the Patayan wares, we conclude that the Patayan pottery was made elsewhere and was not fabricated with local materials at Las Colinas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)984-993
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Ceramic provenance
  • Hohokam
  • Patayan
  • Phyllite
  • SEM-EDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

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