Sense of belonging in school as a protective factor against drug abuse among native american urban adolescents

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Abstract

This article presents the results of a study conducted with 243 Native American students who were part of a multi-ethnic sample of adolescents attending middle school in a large urban center in the Southwest region of the United States. Native adolescents who felt a stronger sense of belonging in their school were found to report a lower lifetime use of alcohol and cigarettes, lower cigarette and marijuana use in the previous month, lower frequency of current use of these substances, fewer substances ever used, and a later age of initiation into drug use than other Native students. Research implications are discussed in relationship to school environment, culturally-grounded prevention curricula, and school social work practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-41
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Drug use
  • Native Americans
  • School belonging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Rehabilitation

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