Self versus counselor perceptions of interpersonal characteristics of female welfare recipients: A cross‐cultural comparison

Irwin Sandler, Martin Holmen, Aaron Schopper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self‐ratings and counselor ratings of the interpersonal characteristics of 232 female welfare recipients in a job‐training program were compared. The welfare recipient sample included 108 Anglos, 55 Mexican‐Americans, and 69 Blacks. The data was analyzed using 3 × 2 analysis of variance (ethnicity of client × rater), and correlations between client and counselor ratings of the clients' interpersonal characteristics were computed. Results indicated that the pattern of relationships between counselor and client ratings for Mexican‐Americans was distinct from the other ethnic groups. Mexican‐Americans were rated by the counselors as being less competitive and dominant, and more apologetic and docile than Blacks or Anglos. Self‐ratings on these dimensions did not differ across ethnic groups. Correlations between counselor and client ratings of interpersonal characteristics of Mexican‐Americans was also lower than those for Anglos or Blacks. The findings were discussed in terms of their implications for the adaptation of Mexican‐Americans to Anglo‐dominated social environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-188
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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