Self-efficacy differences among mildly handicapped, gifted, and nonhandicapped students

Frank M. Gresham, Sally Evans, Stephen N. Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977) suggests that persons develop a sense of efficacy based primarily upon past performance accomplishments in specific situations and settings in which they function. The present investigation assessed the academic and social self-efficacy beliefs of mainstreamed mildly handicapped, gifted, and nonhandicapped students in regular education classrooms. Mainstreamed mildly handicapped students reported lower academic and social self-efficacy than their nonhandicapped and gifted peers. No differences in academic self-efficacy were reported between gifted and nonhandicapped students; however, gifted students reported lower social self-efficacy beliefs than nonhandicapped students. Implications for mainstreaming practices and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-241
Number of pages11
JournalThe Journal of Special Education
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation

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