Self-Driving Cars

Ethical Responsibilities of Design Engineers

Jason Borenstein, Joseph Herkert, Keith Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the wake of the exposure of Volkswagen's diesel engine test-rigging, a Bloomberg Business journalist described the company as driven by engineering-crazed executives [2] and The New York Times ran a story noting how with today's complex computer systems in automobiles, there are numerous opportunities for misdeeds both by automakers and hackers [3]. With the advent of so-called autonomous or self-driving cars, such issues may become even more pervasive and problematic. From a legal perspective, a key focal point is who would be at fault if and when an accident occurs [4]. Much also has been written about the ethical complexities posed by self-driving cars [5]-[6]. In accordance with Moore's Law, [a]s technological revolutions increase their social impact, ethical problems increase [7]. Yet relatively little has been said about the ethical responsibilities of the designers of self-driving cars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7947308
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Technology and Society Magazine
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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hacker
social effects
journalist
motor vehicle
engineer
accident
Railroad cars
engineering
Engineers
responsibility
Law
Automobiles
Diesel engines
Industry
Accidents
Computer systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Self-Driving Cars : Ethical Responsibilities of Design Engineers. / Borenstein, Jason; Herkert, Joseph; Miller, Keith.

In: IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, Vol. 36, No. 2, 7947308, 01.06.2017, p. 67-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borenstein, Jason ; Herkert, Joseph ; Miller, Keith. / Self-Driving Cars : Ethical Responsibilities of Design Engineers. In: IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 67-75.
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