Sampling and Recruitment in Studies of Cultural Influences on Adjustment: A Case Study With Mexican Americans

Mark W. Roosa, Freda F. Liu, Marisela Torres, Nancy Gonzales, George P. Knight, Delia Saenz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research examining how cultural factors affect adjustment of ethnic minority individuals would be strengthened if study samples better represented the diversity within these populations. To recruit a representative sample of Mexican American families, the authors implemented a multiple-step process that included sampling communities to represent diversity in cultural and economic conditions, recruiting participants through schools, using culturally attractive recruitment processes, conducting interviews in participants' homes, and providing a financial incentive. The result was a sample of 750 families that were diverse in cultural orientation, social class, and type of residential communities and were similar to the census description of this population. Thus, using culturally appropriate adaptations to common recruitment strategies makes it possible to recruit representative samples of Mexican Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-302
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Mexican Americans
  • community
  • culture
  • recruitment
  • sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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