Revisiting an RCT study of a parent education program for Latinx parents in the United States: Are treatment effects maintained over time?

Weiwen Zeng, Sandy Magaña, Kristina Lopez, Yue Xu, J. Marisol Marroquín

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined maintenance of treatment effects in a culturally tailored parent education program for Latinx families of children with autism spectrum disorder using a behavior maintenance framework. In a two-site randomized waitlist-control study, we compared differences in parent and child outcomes across three timepoints using linear mixed models to determine whether outcomes observed at 4 months after baseline (Time 2) were maintained for an additional 4-month period (Time 3). Parent outcomes included family empowerment, self-reported confidence in, and frequency of using evidence-based strategies. Child outcomes included parent-reported challenging behaviors, social communication impairments, and the number of services received. Participants were 109 Latina mothers (intervention = 54, control = 55) of children with autism spectrum disorder. Results showed that at Time 3, mothers in the intervention groups reported significantly greater confidence in and frequency of using evidence-based strategies, and that their child received significantly more services. Site-specific treatment differences were found in outcomes such as parent-reported empowerment and child social communication impairments. Findings suggest that the intervention for Latinx parents of children with autism spectrum disorder was efficacious and could be maintained, and that site-specific policy and service differences may need to be examined in future research to inform dissemination and implementation. Lay abstract: Background: We conducted a follow-up investigation of a two-site randomized controlled trial in the United States. We examined whether the treatment effects in a culturally tailored parent education program for Latinx families of children with autism spectrum disorder were maintained over time. Methods: Using linear mixed models, we compared differences in parent and child outcomes across three timepoints: baseline, 4 months after baseline (Time 2), and 8 months after baseline (T3). Parent outcomes included family empowerment, self-reported confidence in, and frequency of using evidence-based strategies. Child outcomes included parent-reported challenging behaviors, social communication impairments, and the number of services received. Participants were 109 Latina mothers (intervention = 54, control = 55) of children with autism spectrum disorder. Results: After intervention at both Time 2 and Time 3 in both sites, mothers in the intervention groups reported significantly greater confidence in and frequency of using evidence-based strategies, and that their child received significantly more services. We also found that there were treatment differences across the two study sites in several outcomes. Implications: The intervention for Latinx parents of children with autism spectrum disorder was efficacious and could be maintained, and that site-specific policy and service differences may need to be examined in future research to inform dissemination and implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAutism
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • children with ASD
  • Latinx families
  • parent education
  • randomized controlled trial (RCT)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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