Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males

Benjamin Trumble, Eleanor Brindle, Michalina Kupsik, Kathleen A. O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The male reproductive axis is responsive to energetic deficits, including multiday fasts, but little is known about brief periods of fasting (<24 hours). Reduced testosterone in low-energy balance situations is hypothesized to reflect redirection of resources from reproduction to survival. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone levels decrease during a minor caloric deficiency by assessing the effects of a single missed (evening) meal on morning testosterone in 23 healthy male participants, age 19-36. Methods: Participants provided daily saliva and urine samples for two baseline days and the morning following an evening fast (water only after 4 PM). Testosterone, cortisol, and luteinizing hormone were measured with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Fasting specimens had significantly lower overnight urinary luteinizing hormone (P = 0.045) and morning salivary testosterone than baseline (P = 0.037). In contrast to morning salivary testosterone, there was a significant increase in overnight urinary testosterone (P = 0.000) following the evening fast, suggesting an increase in urinary clearance rates. There was a marginal increase in overnight urinary cortisol (P = 0.100), but not morning salivary cortisol (P = 0.589). Conclusion: These results suggest the male reproductive axis may react more quickly to energetic imbalances than has been previously appreciated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)775-781
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

testosterone
meals
meals (menu)
young adults
young adult
Meals
Testosterone
Young Adult
deficit
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
fasting
energy
water
luteinizing hormone
Luteinizing Hormone
hormone
Fasting
resources
energetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males. / Trumble, Benjamin; Brindle, Eleanor; Kupsik, Michalina; O'Connor, Kathleen A.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 775-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trumble, Benjamin ; Brindle, Eleanor ; Kupsik, Michalina ; O'Connor, Kathleen A. / Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males. In: American Journal of Human Biology. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 775-781.
@article{fe8993cc8aee4309835a961d916bd264,
title = "Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males",
abstract = "Objectives: The male reproductive axis is responsive to energetic deficits, including multiday fasts, but little is known about brief periods of fasting (<24 hours). Reduced testosterone in low-energy balance situations is hypothesized to reflect redirection of resources from reproduction to survival. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone levels decrease during a minor caloric deficiency by assessing the effects of a single missed (evening) meal on morning testosterone in 23 healthy male participants, age 19-36. Methods: Participants provided daily saliva and urine samples for two baseline days and the morning following an evening fast (water only after 4 PM). Testosterone, cortisol, and luteinizing hormone were measured with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Fasting specimens had significantly lower overnight urinary luteinizing hormone (P = 0.045) and morning salivary testosterone than baseline (P = 0.037). In contrast to morning salivary testosterone, there was a significant increase in overnight urinary testosterone (P = 0.000) following the evening fast, suggesting an increase in urinary clearance rates. There was a marginal increase in overnight urinary cortisol (P = 0.100), but not morning salivary cortisol (P = 0.589). Conclusion: These results suggest the male reproductive axis may react more quickly to energetic imbalances than has been previously appreciated.",
author = "Benjamin Trumble and Eleanor Brindle and Michalina Kupsik and O'Connor, {Kathleen A.}",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/ajhb.21079",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "775--781",
journal = "American Journal of Human Biology",
issn = "1042-0533",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males

AU - Trumble, Benjamin

AU - Brindle, Eleanor

AU - Kupsik, Michalina

AU - O'Connor, Kathleen A.

PY - 2010/11

Y1 - 2010/11

N2 - Objectives: The male reproductive axis is responsive to energetic deficits, including multiday fasts, but little is known about brief periods of fasting (<24 hours). Reduced testosterone in low-energy balance situations is hypothesized to reflect redirection of resources from reproduction to survival. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone levels decrease during a minor caloric deficiency by assessing the effects of a single missed (evening) meal on morning testosterone in 23 healthy male participants, age 19-36. Methods: Participants provided daily saliva and urine samples for two baseline days and the morning following an evening fast (water only after 4 PM). Testosterone, cortisol, and luteinizing hormone were measured with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Fasting specimens had significantly lower overnight urinary luteinizing hormone (P = 0.045) and morning salivary testosterone than baseline (P = 0.037). In contrast to morning salivary testosterone, there was a significant increase in overnight urinary testosterone (P = 0.000) following the evening fast, suggesting an increase in urinary clearance rates. There was a marginal increase in overnight urinary cortisol (P = 0.100), but not morning salivary cortisol (P = 0.589). Conclusion: These results suggest the male reproductive axis may react more quickly to energetic imbalances than has been previously appreciated.

AB - Objectives: The male reproductive axis is responsive to energetic deficits, including multiday fasts, but little is known about brief periods of fasting (<24 hours). Reduced testosterone in low-energy balance situations is hypothesized to reflect redirection of resources from reproduction to survival. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone levels decrease during a minor caloric deficiency by assessing the effects of a single missed (evening) meal on morning testosterone in 23 healthy male participants, age 19-36. Methods: Participants provided daily saliva and urine samples for two baseline days and the morning following an evening fast (water only after 4 PM). Testosterone, cortisol, and luteinizing hormone were measured with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Fasting specimens had significantly lower overnight urinary luteinizing hormone (P = 0.045) and morning salivary testosterone than baseline (P = 0.037). In contrast to morning salivary testosterone, there was a significant increase in overnight urinary testosterone (P = 0.000) following the evening fast, suggesting an increase in urinary clearance rates. There was a marginal increase in overnight urinary cortisol (P = 0.100), but not morning salivary cortisol (P = 0.589). Conclusion: These results suggest the male reproductive axis may react more quickly to energetic imbalances than has been previously appreciated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952197371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952197371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ajhb.21079

DO - 10.1002/ajhb.21079

M3 - Article

C2 - 20721980

AN - SCOPUS:79952197371

VL - 22

SP - 775

EP - 781

JO - American Journal of Human Biology

JF - American Journal of Human Biology

SN - 1042-0533

IS - 6

ER -