Religion and rational choice theory1

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most (but not all) classical sociologists not only regarded religion as irrational; they also considered it to be an emergent rather than an individual phenomenon. Sacredness, that quintessentially distinctive reHgious attitude, could not be attributed to an individual’s preference for a specific good, but necessarily referred to a socially constructed source of sanctity (Parsons, 1937: 711). Parsons’ claim carried with it the notion, unpalatable to many contemporary sociologists, that religion is a subject that is unsuitable for any kind of positive analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRational Choice Theory and Religion
Subtitle of host publicationSummary and Assessment
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages147-159
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781134953424
ISBN (Print)9780415911917
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Hechter, M. (2016). Religion and rational choice theory1. In Rational Choice Theory and Religion: Summary and Assessment (pp. 147-159). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315538877-18