Reciprocal relations between objectively measured sleep patterns and diurnal cortisol rhythms in late adolescence

Katharine H. Zeiders, Leah Doane, Emma K. Adam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To examine how hours of sleep and wake times relate to between-person differences and day-to-day changes in diurnal cortisol rhythms in late adolescence. Methods: Older adolescents (N = 119) provided six cortisol samples (wakeup, +30 minutes, +2 hours, +8 hours, +12 hours, and bedtime) on each of three consecutive days while wearing an actigraph. We examined how average (across 3 days) and day-to-day changes in hours of sleep and wake times related to diurnal cortisol patterns. Results: On average, more hours of sleep related to steeper decline in cortisol across the days. Day-to-day analyses revealed that the hours of sleep of the previous night predicted steeper diurnal slopes the next day, whereas greater waking cortisol levels and steeper slopes predicted more hours of sleep and a later wake time the next day. Conclusion: Our results suggest a bidirectional relationship between sleep and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)566-571
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Adolescence
  • Cortisol
  • Diary studies
  • Diurnal rhythms
  • HPA axis
  • Naturalistic
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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