Reading aloud: When the effect of stimulus quality distinguishes between cascaded and thresholded components

Chris Blais, Derek Besner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A central feature of many formal accounts of reading aloud, and of Coltheart and colleagues dual-route cascaded model in particular, is that activation across various modules is cascaded. Evidence is reviewed that this assumption is problematic in a particular context, along with a solution that involves thresholding the output of the letter level to the nonlexical routine. Consideration of the known effects of repetition leads to the prediction of a three-way interaction between stimulus quality, repetition, and lexicality in which repetition and stimulus quality interact when reading aloud exception words, but produce additive effects when reading aloud nonwords. The result of such an experiment confirms this prediction, and appears consistent with the localized dual-route model. Implications for other accounts are briefly noted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-224
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental Psychology
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cascading processing
  • Frequency
  • Reading aloud
  • Repetition
  • Stimulus quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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