Rationality in collective decision-making by ant colonies

Susan C. Edwards, Stephen Pratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Economic models of animal behaviour assume that decision-makers are rational, meaning that they assess options according to intrinsic fitness value and not by comparison with available alternatives. This expectation is frequently violated, but the significance of irrational behaviour remains controversial. One possibility is that irrationality arises from cognitive constraints that necessitate short cuts like comparative evaluation. If so, the study of whether and when irrationality occurs can illuminate cognitive mechanisms. We applied this logic in a novel setting: the collective decisions of insect societies. We tested for irrationality in colonies of Temnothorax ants choosing between two nest sites that varied in multiple attributes, such that neither site was clearly superior. In similar situations, individual animals show irrational changes in preference when a third relatively unattractive option is introduced. In contrast, we found no such effect in colonies. We suggest that immunity to irrationality in this case may result from the ants' decentralized decision mechanism. A colony's choice does not depend on site comparison by individuals, but instead self-organizes from the interactions of multiple ants, most of which are aware of only a single site. This strategy may filter out comparative effects, preventing systematic errors that would otherwise arise from the cognitive limitations of individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3655-3661
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume276
Issue number1673
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2009

Fingerprint

Ants
ant
decision making
Decision Making
Formicidae
Animals
Decision making
Systematic errors
Temnothorax
Economic Models
insect colonies
Animal Behavior
econometric models
nest site
immunity
nesting sites
animal behavior
Economics
Insects
Immunity

Keywords

  • Asymmetric dominance
  • Collective decision-making
  • Context-dependent preferences
  • Rationality
  • Regularity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rationality in collective decision-making by ant colonies. / Edwards, Susan C.; Pratt, Stephen.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 276, No. 1673, 22.10.2009, p. 3655-3661.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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