Production of San Juan Red ware in the northern Southwest: Insights into regional interaction in early puebloan prehistory

Michelle Hegmon, James R. Allison, Hector Neff, Michael D. Glascock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

San Juan Red ware pottery was distributed across the northern Southwest from the eighth through tenth centuries A.D., though made only in the northern San Juan region. This paper investigates the concentration (Costin 1991) of San Juan Red ware production through neutron activation analysis of the pottery and raw materials. Production was concentrated in the area of southeast Utah, and within that area it appears to have been produced at only a limited number of sources, possibly by specialized pottery-making communities. These results have implications regarding economic organization, exchange, and mobility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-463
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Antiquity
Volume62
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1997

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prehistory
interaction
raw materials
activation
organization
community
economics
Southwest
Interaction
Prehistory
Pottery
Economics
Southeast
Pottery-making
Raw Materials
Neutron Activation Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • History
  • Archaeology
  • Museology

Cite this

Production of San Juan Red ware in the northern Southwest : Insights into regional interaction in early puebloan prehistory. / Hegmon, Michelle; Allison, James R.; Neff, Hector; Glascock, Michael D.

In: American Antiquity, Vol. 62, No. 3, 07.1997, p. 449-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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