Probation violations, revocations, and imprisonment: The decisions of probation officers, prosecutors, and judges pre- and post-mandatory drug treatment

Nancy Rodriguez, Vincent Webb

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    16 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The focus of previous probation studies has been on identifying the significant predictors of probation outcomes (e.g., violations and arrests) and probation processes (e.g., revocation). In this study, the authors examine how the passage of Arizona's mandatory drug treatment law affected probation violations and the revocation process. They rely on probation, prosecution, and sentencing case file data of imprisoned low-level drug offenders to analyze how the mandatory drug treatment law influenced the decision-making processes of probation officers, prosecutors, and judges. Findings indicate that the majority of revocations leading to incarceration involved technical violations and not the commission of new crimes. Furthermore, the type of violations significantly differed pre- and postimplementation of the law, as did prosecution and sentencing decisions. Policy implications for probation supervision and drug treatment laws are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3-30
    Number of pages28
    JournalCriminal Justice Policy Review
    Volume18
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 2007

    Keywords

    • Mandatory drug treatment
    • Probation revocation
    • Probation violations

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Law

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