Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT

Jenny Rossen, Agneta Yngve, Maria Hagströmer, Kerstin Brismar, Barbara Ainsworth, Christina Iskull, Peter Möller, Unn Britt Johansson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Physical activity prevents or delays progression of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk individuals. Physical activity promotion should serve as a basis in diabetes care. It is necessary to develop and evaluate health-promoting methods that are feasible as well as cost-effective within diabetes care. The aim of Sophia Step Study is to evaluate the impact of a multi-component and a single component physical activity intervention aiming at improving HbA<inf>1c</inf> (primary outcome) and other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes. Methods/design: Sophia Step Study is a randomized controlled trial and participants are randomly assigned to either a multi-component intervention group (A), a pedometer group (B) or a control group (C). In total, 310 patients will be included and followed for 24 months. Group A participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps, physical activity on prescription with yearly follow-ups, motivational interviewing (10 occasions) and group consultations (including walks, 12 occasions). Group B participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps. Group C are offered usual care. The theoretical framework underpinning the interventions is the Health Belief Model, the Stages of Change Model, and the Social Cognitive Theory. Both the multi-component intervention (group A) and the pedometer intervention (group B) are using several techniques for behavior change such as self-monitoring, goal setting, feedback and relapse prevention. Measurements are made at week 0, 8, 12, 16, month 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24, including metabolic and cardiovascular biomarkers (HbA<inf>1c</inf> as primary health outcome), accelerometry and daily steps. Furthermore, questionnaires were used to evaluate dietary intake, physical activity, perceived ability to perform physical activity, perceived support for being active, quality of life, anxiety, depression, well-being, perceived treatment, perceived stress and diabetes self- efficacy. Discussion: This study will show if a multi-component intervention using pedometers with group- and individual consultations is more effective than a single- component intervention using pedometers alone, in increasing physical activity and improving HbA<inf>1c</inf>, other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02374788. Registered 28 January 2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number647
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 12 2015

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Primary Health Care
Exercise
Health Status
Health
Referral and Consultation
Accelerometry
Motivational Interviewing
Aptitude
Glucose Intolerance
Self Efficacy
Secondary Prevention
Prescriptions
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Depression
Costs and Cost Analysis
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Behavior change
  • HbA<inf>1c</inf>
  • Intervention
  • Metabolic health
  • Pedometer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rossen, J., Yngve, A., Hagströmer, M., Brismar, K., Ainsworth, B., Iskull, C., ... Johansson, U. B. (2015). Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT. BMC Public Health, 15(1), [647]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1941-9

Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT. / Rossen, Jenny; Yngve, Agneta; Hagströmer, Maria; Brismar, Kerstin; Ainsworth, Barbara; Iskull, Christina; Möller, Peter; Johansson, Unn Britt.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 1, 647, 12.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossen, J, Yngve, A, Hagströmer, M, Brismar, K, Ainsworth, B, Iskull, C, Möller, P & Johansson, UB 2015, 'Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT', BMC Public Health, vol. 15, no. 1, 647. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1941-9
Rossen, Jenny ; Yngve, Agneta ; Hagströmer, Maria ; Brismar, Kerstin ; Ainsworth, Barbara ; Iskull, Christina ; Möller, Peter ; Johansson, Unn Britt. / Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT. In: BMC Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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