Personal strategic alliances: enhancing the scientific and technological contributions of university faculty in Malaysia

V. G R Chandran, Christopher Hayter, Derek Ryan Strong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scientific and technological human capital is a critical element for the economic and social advancement of countries in the developing world. Using Malaysia as an example, this paper examines the relationship between the research productivity of university faculty and human capital development with a specific focus on personal strategic alliances. The results show that educational attainment, location at a designated research university, and consulting experience positively influence faculty publication productivity. Furthermore, alliances established through consulting, applied research, and entrepreneurial experiences are critical for the development of new technologies stemming from university research. Malaysia's experience may hold lessons for developing countries: the full development potential of human capital investments may only be realized by simultaneously strengthening and supporting personal strategic alliances with communities outside academia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-435
Number of pages15
JournalEconomics of Innovation and New Technology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2015

Keywords

  • Malaysia
  • human capital
  • research productivity
  • science and technology policy
  • social networks
  • strategic alliances
  • universities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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