Persistent cannabis users show neuropsychological decline from childhood to midlife

Madeline H. Meier, Avshalom Caspi, Antony Ambler, Hona Lee Harrington, Renate Houts, Richard S.E. Keefe, Kay McDonald, Aimee Ward, Richie Poulton, Terrie E. Moffitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

924 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent reports show that fewer adolescents believe that regular cannabis use is harmful to health. Concomitantly, adolescents are initiating cannabis use at younger ages, and more adolescents are using cannabis on a daily basis. The purpose of the present study was to test the association between persistent cannabis use and neuropsychological decline and determine whether decline is concentrated among adolescent-onset cannabis users. Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a prospective study of a birth cohort of 1,037 individuals followed from birth (1972/1973) to age 38 y. Cannabis use was ascertained in interviews at ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 y. Neuropsychological testing was conducted at age 13 y, before initiation of cannabis use, and again at age 38 y, after a pattern of persistent cannabis use had developed. Persistent cannabis use was associated with neuropsychological decline broadly across domains of functioning, even after controlling for years of education. Informants also reported noticing more cognitive problems for persistent cannabis users. Impairment was concentrated among adolescent-onset cannabis users, with more persistent use associated with greater decline. Further, cessation of cannabis use did not fully restore neuropsychological functioning among adolescent-onset cannabis users. Findings are suggestive of a neurotoxic effect of cannabis on the adolescent brain and highlight the importance of prevention and policy efforts targeting adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E2657-E2664
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume109
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Longitudinal
  • Marijuana

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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