Peer influence on adolescent alcohol use: The moderating role of parental support and discipline

Michael P. Marshal, Laurie Chassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

137 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the moderating effects of parental social support and consistency of discipline on the relation between adolescents’ affiliation with drug-use promoting peers and their subsequent alcohol use. Participants were a subsample (n = 300) of 454 children of alcoholics and matched community controls (ages 10½–15½ years). Results indicated that mothers’ and fathers’ social support and consistency of discipline buffered the effects of peer group affiliation on girls’ alcohol use; however, both variables exacerbated peer effects on boys’ alcohol use. For girls, results are consistent with the notion that parenting behaviors can serve as protective factors by promoting qualities that serve to resist peer group pressure. For boys, increases in support and discipline behaviors may be interpreted as threats to autonomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-88
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Developmental Science
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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