Parents' coresidence with adult children

Can immigration explain racial and ethnic variation?

Jennifer E. Glick, Jennifer Van Hook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is considerable racial and ethnic variation in the prevalence of intergenerational coresidence in the United States. Using data from the Current Population Surveys, we demonstrate that much of this is attributable to recent immigration and the relative economic position of immigrant parents. Multinomial logistic regression results reveal that recent immigrant parents, particularly Asian and Central and South American immigrant parents, are more likely to live in households in which their adult children provide most of the household income. The likelihood of living in this "dependent" role decreases with duration of residence in the United States. The likelihood of living in an intergenerational household in which the parent provides the majority of the household income is not as tied to nativity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-253
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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immigration
parents
immigrant
household income
logistics
regression
Household
Immigration
economics
Immigrants
Income

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Economic support
  • Immigration
  • Intergenerational relations
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Parents' coresidence with adult children : Can immigration explain racial and ethnic variation? / Glick, Jennifer E.; Van Hook, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 64, No. 1, 2002, p. 240-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glick, Jennifer E. ; Van Hook, Jennifer. / Parents' coresidence with adult children : Can immigration explain racial and ethnic variation?. In: Journal of Marriage and Family. 2002 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 240-253.
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