Outcomes in work-related upper extremity and low back injuries

Results of a retrospective study

Glenn Pransky, Katy Benjamin, Carolyn Hill-Fotouhi, Jay Himmelstein, Kenneth E. Fletcher, Jeffrey N. Katz, William Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The outcomes of treatment for work-related injuries and illnesses are multidimensional and complex, but have rarely been explored in detail. This study was intended to provide information on a sample of workers representing a range of jobs and employers typical of the workers compensation system. Method: A mailed, self-report survey measuring multiple dimensions was conducted. Identified through the New Hampshire Division of Workers' Compensation First Report of Injury database, a sample of workers with injuries to their lower back (60%) or upper extremities (40%) a year prior to the study were surveyed. Response rate was 80% (N = 169; upper extremity cases = 70; low back cases = 99). Results: Most (82.8%) were working one year post-injury. Over half reported residual effects of the injury on work or activities of daily living. Many working subjects reported persistent injury-related anxiety and pain at the end of the work day, worse in those with low back pain compared to those with upper extremity injuries. Almost 40% of those who returned to work suffered a rein jury. Forty-four percent of respondents suffered significant injury-related financial problems, which were worse in those who had been out of work for longer periods. Conclusion: Occupational musculoskeletal injuries do result in significant, long-term adverse physical, economic, and psychological consequences, as demonstrated in self-reported surveys. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-409
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Back Injuries
Upper Extremity
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries
Workers' Compensation
Occupational Injuries
Activities of Daily Living
Low Back Pain
Self Report
Anxiety
Economics
Databases
Psychology
Pain

Keywords

  • Functional status
  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • Occupational disorders
  • Occupational injuries
  • Outcomes
  • Work disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Outcomes in work-related upper extremity and low back injuries : Results of a retrospective study. / Pransky, Glenn; Benjamin, Katy; Hill-Fotouhi, Carolyn; Himmelstein, Jay; Fletcher, Kenneth E.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Johnson, William.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 4, 2000, p. 400-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pransky, Glenn ; Benjamin, Katy ; Hill-Fotouhi, Carolyn ; Himmelstein, Jay ; Fletcher, Kenneth E. ; Katz, Jeffrey N. ; Johnson, William. / Outcomes in work-related upper extremity and low back injuries : Results of a retrospective study. In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 400-409.
@article{de00da8905ea4ee1a2d0b99e6b92b636,
title = "Outcomes in work-related upper extremity and low back injuries: Results of a retrospective study",
abstract = "Background: The outcomes of treatment for work-related injuries and illnesses are multidimensional and complex, but have rarely been explored in detail. This study was intended to provide information on a sample of workers representing a range of jobs and employers typical of the workers compensation system. Method: A mailed, self-report survey measuring multiple dimensions was conducted. Identified through the New Hampshire Division of Workers' Compensation First Report of Injury database, a sample of workers with injuries to their lower back (60{\%}) or upper extremities (40{\%}) a year prior to the study were surveyed. Response rate was 80{\%} (N = 169; upper extremity cases = 70; low back cases = 99). Results: Most (82.8{\%}) were working one year post-injury. Over half reported residual effects of the injury on work or activities of daily living. Many working subjects reported persistent injury-related anxiety and pain at the end of the work day, worse in those with low back pain compared to those with upper extremity injuries. Almost 40{\%} of those who returned to work suffered a rein jury. Forty-four percent of respondents suffered significant injury-related financial problems, which were worse in those who had been out of work for longer periods. Conclusion: Occupational musculoskeletal injuries do result in significant, long-term adverse physical, economic, and psychological consequences, as demonstrated in self-reported surveys. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.",
keywords = "Functional status, Musculoskeletal disorders, Occupational disorders, Occupational injuries, Outcomes, Work disability",
author = "Glenn Pransky and Katy Benjamin and Carolyn Hill-Fotouhi and Jay Himmelstein and Fletcher, {Kenneth E.} and Katz, {Jeffrey N.} and William Johnson",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1002/(SICI)1097-0274(200004)37:4<400::AID-AJIM10>3.0.CO;2-C",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "400--409",
journal = "American Journal of Industrial Medicine",
issn = "0271-3586",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outcomes in work-related upper extremity and low back injuries

T2 - Results of a retrospective study

AU - Pransky, Glenn

AU - Benjamin, Katy

AU - Hill-Fotouhi, Carolyn

AU - Himmelstein, Jay

AU - Fletcher, Kenneth E.

AU - Katz, Jeffrey N.

AU - Johnson, William

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Background: The outcomes of treatment for work-related injuries and illnesses are multidimensional and complex, but have rarely been explored in detail. This study was intended to provide information on a sample of workers representing a range of jobs and employers typical of the workers compensation system. Method: A mailed, self-report survey measuring multiple dimensions was conducted. Identified through the New Hampshire Division of Workers' Compensation First Report of Injury database, a sample of workers with injuries to their lower back (60%) or upper extremities (40%) a year prior to the study were surveyed. Response rate was 80% (N = 169; upper extremity cases = 70; low back cases = 99). Results: Most (82.8%) were working one year post-injury. Over half reported residual effects of the injury on work or activities of daily living. Many working subjects reported persistent injury-related anxiety and pain at the end of the work day, worse in those with low back pain compared to those with upper extremity injuries. Almost 40% of those who returned to work suffered a rein jury. Forty-four percent of respondents suffered significant injury-related financial problems, which were worse in those who had been out of work for longer periods. Conclusion: Occupational musculoskeletal injuries do result in significant, long-term adverse physical, economic, and psychological consequences, as demonstrated in self-reported surveys. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

AB - Background: The outcomes of treatment for work-related injuries and illnesses are multidimensional and complex, but have rarely been explored in detail. This study was intended to provide information on a sample of workers representing a range of jobs and employers typical of the workers compensation system. Method: A mailed, self-report survey measuring multiple dimensions was conducted. Identified through the New Hampshire Division of Workers' Compensation First Report of Injury database, a sample of workers with injuries to their lower back (60%) or upper extremities (40%) a year prior to the study were surveyed. Response rate was 80% (N = 169; upper extremity cases = 70; low back cases = 99). Results: Most (82.8%) were working one year post-injury. Over half reported residual effects of the injury on work or activities of daily living. Many working subjects reported persistent injury-related anxiety and pain at the end of the work day, worse in those with low back pain compared to those with upper extremity injuries. Almost 40% of those who returned to work suffered a rein jury. Forty-four percent of respondents suffered significant injury-related financial problems, which were worse in those who had been out of work for longer periods. Conclusion: Occupational musculoskeletal injuries do result in significant, long-term adverse physical, economic, and psychological consequences, as demonstrated in self-reported surveys. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

KW - Functional status

KW - Musculoskeletal disorders

KW - Occupational disorders

KW - Occupational injuries

KW - Outcomes

KW - Work disability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034092039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034092039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0274(200004)37:4<400::AID-AJIM10>3.0.CO;2-C

DO - 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0274(200004)37:4<400::AID-AJIM10>3.0.CO;2-C

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 400

EP - 409

JO - American Journal of Industrial Medicine

JF - American Journal of Industrial Medicine

SN - 0271-3586

IS - 4

ER -