Abstract

The diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes are important drivers of atmospheric boundary layer development and convective precipitation, particularly in regions with heterogeneous land surface conditions such as those under the influence of the North American monsoon (NAM). Characterization of diurnal surface fluxes and their controls has not been well constrained due to the paucity of observations in the NAM region. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the uncoupled WRF-Hydro modeling system in its ability to represent soil moisture, turbulent heat fluxes, and surface temperature observations and compare these to operational analyses from other commonly used land surface models (LSMs). After a rigorous model evaluation, we quantify how the diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes vary during the warm season for the major ecosystems in a regional basin. We find that the diurnal cycle of latent heat flux is more sensitive to ecosystem type than sensible heat flux due to the response of plant transpiration to variations in soil water content. Furthermore, the peak timing of precipitation affects the shape and magnitude of the diurnal cycle of plant transpiration in water-stressed ecosystems, inducing mesoscale heterogeneity in land surface conditions between the major ecosystems within the basin. Comparisons to other LSMs indicate that ecosystem differences in the diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes are underestimated in these products. While this study shows how land surface heterogeneity affects the simulated diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes, additional coupled modeling efforts are needed to identify the potential impacts of these spatial differences on convective precipitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9024-9049
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume122
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2017

Fingerprint

monsoons
surface energy
energy flux
Interfacial energy
ecosystems
land surface
monsoon
Fluxes
Ecosystems
cycles
energy
ecosystem
modeling
heat flux
transpiration
Heat flux
Transpiration
heat
atmospheric boundary layer
surface flux

Keywords

  • distributed hydrologic modeling
  • evapotranspiration
  • hyperresolution
  • northwest Mexico
  • surface energy balance
  • vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

On the diurnal cycle of surface energy fluxes in the North American monsoon region using the WRF-Hydro modeling system. / Xiang, Tiantian; Vivoni, Enrique; Gochis, David J.; Mascaro, Giuseppe.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 122, No. 17, 16.09.2017, p. 9024-9049.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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