On NSF "open questions," some external properties of the brain as a learning system and an architecture for autonomous learning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 2007 NSF workshop report titled "Future Challenges for the Science and Engineering of Learning" (http://www.cnl.salk.edu/Media/ NSFWorkshopReport.v4.pdf) raises lots of questions about how the brain works and learns and they have important implications for the development of autonomous adaptive systems. The report also defines some general characteristics of biological learners that, in essence, impose constraints on any kind of learning systems that we call brain-like. This paper examines these general characteristics of biological learners, as defined in the NSF report, and relates them to a set of properties of brain-like learning defined as early as 1994 [12]. The paper also shows how a control theoretic architecture for autonomous learning systems mitigates or resolves many of the "open questions" posed by the NSF report. It also provides some recent evidence from neuroscience on the nature of learning in biological systems that support the notion that the brain has a control theoretic architecture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event2010 6th IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, WCCI 2010 - 2010 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, IJCNN 2010 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: Jul 18 2010Jul 23 2010

Other

Other2010 6th IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, WCCI 2010 - 2010 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, IJCNN 2010
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period7/18/107/23/10

Fingerprint

Learning systems
Brain
Adaptive systems
Biological systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

On NSF "open questions," some external properties of the brain as a learning system and an architecture for autonomous learning. / Roy, Asim.

Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks. 2010. 5596769.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Roy, A 2010, On NSF "open questions," some external properties of the brain as a learning system and an architecture for autonomous learning. in Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks., 5596769, 2010 6th IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, WCCI 2010 - 2010 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, IJCNN 2010, Barcelona, Spain, 7/18/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/IJCNN.2010.5596769
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