Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials as a treatment for adults with Attention Deficit-/Hyperactivity Disorder

Kerstin Mayer, Friederike Blume, Sarah Wyckoff, Luisa Leonie Brokmeier, Ute Strehl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Attention Deficit-/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been treated successfully in children with neurofeedback (NF). In this study, for the first time NF is investigated in adults with ADHD. To answer the question of specificity the relationship between treatment outcome and self-regulation ability is assessed. Methods: Twenty-four participants underwent 30 sessions of slow cortical potential NF. Measurements of ADHD and comorbid symptoms, as well as neurophysiological data (reaction time (RT) and RT variability (RTV) and contingent negative variation (CNV)) were performed before and after treatment, and again six months after sessions were completed. Participants were categorized into self-regulation learners and non-learners. Results: Significant improvements on all symptom scales were observed with medium to large effect sizes after treatment and six months post treatment. RT and RTV decreased significantly and there was a trend for an increased CNV. Half of the participants successfully learned to regulate their brain activity. In the long-term, symptoms in the group of learners improved more than in non-learners with large effect sizes. Conclusion: NF is effective in treating adult ADHD long-term. The impact of self-regulation ability and possible unspecific effects still require further investigation. Significance: This study is the first to investigate the effects of NF in adults with ADHD, relating clinical outcome to self-regulation performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1374-1386
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume127
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurofeedback
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Contingent Negative Variation
Reaction Time
Aptitude
Therapeutics
Self-Control
Brain

Keywords

  • Adult ADHD
  • CNV
  • Neurofeedback
  • SCP
  • Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials as a treatment for adults with Attention Deficit-/Hyperactivity Disorder. / Mayer, Kerstin; Blume, Friederike; Wyckoff, Sarah; Brokmeier, Luisa Leonie; Strehl, Ute.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 127, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 1374-1386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mayer, Kerstin ; Blume, Friederike ; Wyckoff, Sarah ; Brokmeier, Luisa Leonie ; Strehl, Ute. / Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials as a treatment for adults with Attention Deficit-/Hyperactivity Disorder. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2016 ; Vol. 127, No. 2. pp. 1374-1386.
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