Negative affectivity and the reporting of stressful life events.

Joan Brett, A. P. Brief, M. J. Burke, J. M. George, J. Webster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maddi, Bartone, and Puccetti (1987) and Schroeder and Costa (1984) reported inconsistent findings regarding the impact of negative affectivity (NA; i.e., neuroticism) contaminated life event items on observed life event-illness relationships. Here, unlike the previous studied, such contaminated items were nonjudgmentally identified. Among a sample of managers and professionals, it was found that NA-contaminated items correlated significantly with three measures of well-being (depression, life satisfaction, and physical symptoms) and that uncontaminated items were unassociated with the well-being indicators. Moreover, in two of three cases, the correlations between contaminated items and the well-being measures were significantly different from the correlations between uncontaminated items and the well-being indicators. Therefore, we concluded that prior life event-well-being findings are inflated considerably by the use of NA-contaminated events. Suggestions for future life events research that incorporate the NA construct are detailed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-68
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Neuroticism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Negative affectivity and the reporting of stressful life events. / Brett, Joan; Brief, A. P.; Burke, M. J.; George, J. M.; Webster, J.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1990, p. 57-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brett, Joan ; Brief, A. P. ; Burke, M. J. ; George, J. M. ; Webster, J. / Negative affectivity and the reporting of stressful life events. In: Health Psychology. 1990 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 57-68.
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