MultiRTA

A simple yet reliable method for predicting peptide binding affinities for multiple class II MHC allotypes

Andrew J. Bordner, Hans Mittelmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The identification of such peptide epitopes has potential applications in vaccine design and in better understanding autoimmune diseases and allergies. However, comprehensive experimental determination of peptide-MHC binding affinities is infeasible due to MHC diversity and the large number of possible peptide sequences. Computational methods trained on the limited experimental binding data can address this challenge. We present the MultiRTA method, an extension of our previous single-type RTA prediction method, which allows the prediction of peptide binding affinities for multiple MHC allotypes not used to train the model. Thus predictions can be made for many MHC allotypes for which experimental binding data is unavailable.Results: We fit MultiRTA models for both HLA-DR and HLA-DP using large experimental binding data sets. The performance in predicting binding affinities for novel MHC allotypes, not in the training set, was tested in two different ways. First, we performed leave-one-allele-out cross-validation, in which predictions are made for one allotype using a model fit to binding data for the remaining MHC allotypes. Comparison of the HLA-DR results with those of two other prediction methods applied to the same data sets showed that MultiRTA achieved performance comparable to NetMHCIIpan and better than the earlier TEPITOPE method. We also directly tested model transferability by making leave-one-allele-out predictions for additional experimentally characterized sets of overlapping peptide epitopes binding to multiple MHC allotypes. In addition, we determined the applicability of prediction methods like MultiRTA to other MHC allotypes by examining the degree of MHC variation accounted for in the training set. An examination of predictions for the promiscuous binding CLIP peptide revealed variations in binding affinity among alleles as well as potentially distinct binding registers for HLA-DR and HLA-DP. Finally, we analyzed the optimal MultiRTA parameters to discover the most important peptide residues for promiscuous and allele-specific binding to HLA-DR and HLA-DP allotypes.Conclusions: The MultiRTA method yields competitive performance but with a significantly simpler and physically interpretable model compared with previous prediction methods. A MultiRTA prediction webserver is available at http://bordnerlab.org/MultiRTA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number482
JournalBMC Bioinformatics
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 24 2010

Fingerprint

Peptides
Affine transformation
HLA-DP Antigens
HLA-DR Antigens
Prediction
Alleles
Epitopes
Peptide Fragments
Class
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Allergies
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Vaccines
T-cells
Rapid thermal annealing
Autoimmune Diseases
Antigens
Hypersensitivity
Computational methods
Model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Structural Biology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

MultiRTA : A simple yet reliable method for predicting peptide binding affinities for multiple class II MHC allotypes. / Bordner, Andrew J.; Mittelmann, Hans.

In: BMC Bioinformatics, Vol. 11, 482, 24.09.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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