Mother-daughter conflict and adjustment in Mexican-origin families: Exploring the role of family and sociocultural context

Kimberly Updegraff, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Norma J. Perez-Brena, Jacqueline Pflieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the role of mother-daughter conflict in both mothers' and daughters' adjustment. Drawing from ecologically oriented and person-environment fit models, the authors investigated how the family context, as defined by the transition to adolescent motherhood, and the sociocultural context, as measured by mother-daughter discrepancies in cultural orientations, shaped the associations between conflict and adjustment in Mexican-origin families. Overall, conflict was positively related to mothers' and adolescents' depressive symptoms and adolescents' risky behaviors. This relation was strongest when daughters were more Mexican-oriented than their mothers, and weakest when mothers were more Mexican-oriented than their daughters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-81
Number of pages23
JournalNew directions for child and adolescent development
Volume2012
Issue number135
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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